Thursday, April 11, 2013

Constant Calendar



Its Time has come

Our present calendar has always seemed archaic to me, composed of 30 and 31-day months thrown haphazardly together, including one month of 28 days which
increases to 29 every four years. A year of 91-day quarters, each quarter composed of 13 seven-day weeks, would permit each quarter to have the same start and end days. However, since that would only total to 364 days, we would need an extra year-day to fill out our solar year. If we identified that day only as New Years Day, it would not need any other name or number. If we assigned it to January, as it is now, we could assign Leap Year Day, also a day without other name or number, to July. We would gain these advantages:

·                    Each year would start as New Years Day and be followed by January 1, which would always come on the same day name. I have selected Monday for my year and quarter start-day and 30 days for the first two months of each quarter, followed by a third month of 31 days. This would result in the second month always starting on a Wednesday and the third starting on a Friday.
·                    Using this model, a quarter's last day would always be Sunday, the 31st day of its third month. Over time, regular schedule makers could associate a month's date with its name day by a quick mental calculation if a calendar was not handy.
·                    The following model illustrates how every day of the year follows, grouped into first, second, and third-month sequences. Note that this model preserves existing holiday dates, and results in all but two falling on a Monday, making a three-day weekend, or on a weekend.
·                    The first grid shows January additions with New Years Day in the note column. This same grid could be used for July in leap years.
·                    Calendar and desk pad manufacturers might see some fall-off in sales since, theoretically, the same calendar could be used from year to year. However, most users mark up their calendars, and would probably need a new one each year.
·                    Vacation schedules would be easier to plan, since holiday dates would not vary from year to year. Memorial and Labor Day weekends would continue to be three-day, as they are now; Christmas and New Years holidays would always fall on three-day weekends.
·                    Quarterly interest payees would receive equal payments except in quarters with a year-day.
   
Finally, we would be righting a 2,000 year wrong to February with this calendar. Julius and Augustus Caesar each stole a day from it so that the months named for them could have 31 days.


Calendar Layout
Constant 91-day Quarter


JAN – APR – JUL - OCT
YrDay
Mon
Tues
Wed
Thur
Fri
Sat
Sun
Holidays
New Year*
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
NewYears’sDay

8
9
10
11
12
13
14
4th of July

15
16
17
18
19
20
21
Oct 8-Columbus

22
23
24
25
26
27
28
Jan 15-ML King

29
30





*LeapYrDay-July


FEB – MAY – AUG - NOV
YrDay
Mon
Tues
Wed
Thur
Fri
Sat
Sun
Holidays



1
2
3
4
5


6
7
8
9
10
11
12
Nov 11 – Veterans

13
14
15
16
17
18
19
Feb 20-Pres Day

20
21
22
23
24
25
26
Nov 23-T/giving

27
28
29
30



May 27-MemDay


MAR – JUN – SEP - DEC
YrDay
Mon
Tues
Wed
Thur
Fri 
Sat
Sun
Holidays





1
2
3


4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Sep 4 – LaborDay

11
12
13
14
15
16
17


18
19
20
21
22
23
24
Mar24 – Easter*

25
26
27
28
29
30
31
Dec25 - Xmas








*varies to Apr21


Postscript

Fortunately, I developed most of the above during idle moments when I would otherwise have been watching TV commercials. I recently discovered that the concept of 91 day quarters and year-days to complete the solar year was first floated in 1930 as the World Calendar and is maintained by an association of the same name on its website:
Previously unknown to me, it has been around almost as long as I have lived. However, I do not feel like the first shepherd who rolled his invented wheel into a hamlet filled with chariots. First, it has yet to be adopted by any nation or world body. Second, I believe the start-day and year-day placements on the Constant Calendar are preferable to those on the World Calendar for the following reasons:
·                    Placing New Years Day in January assigns it to a month and a quarter, as does placing Leap Year Day, every four years, in July. It also keeps those months at 31 days. This is important for interest calculations.
·                    Calling the year-day Worldsday, a world holiday, and placing it between Saturday and Sunday, which are already weekend days, usually rest-days, is confusing. Is it intended to be New Years Day, or is that still to be on January 1?
·                    Religions that start their year on different days could call our New Years Day whatever name they chose: World Day, UN Day, Allah's Day, or whatever.
·                    Starting the first day of each week on Monday - as well as the first week of each quarter and year - recognizes the reality that most of the developed world follows a work week of five days from Monday to Friday, followed by a weekend of Saturday and Sunday.
·                    Under the World Calendar, Leap Year would provide a 3-day weekend at the end of June followed by two work days and the Fourth of July holiday, disrupting that work week. The Constant Calendar would permit Leap Year Day to be a workday in the United States, which could provide a four-day workweek, followed by a four-day weekend, starting with the Fourth on Thursday.
·                    The World Calendar website lists, as a possible disadvantage, that its calendar provides four Fridays the 13th each year. To those who find that alarming, note that the Constant Calendar has no Friday the 13th.

Either of the two calendars would be an improvement over the present. As the World Calendar website notes, it requires a cycle of 14 years to go through all the possible Gregorian models.

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